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kkddbb

Banned
May 13, 2009
880
129
Nice attempt at a recovery from your first short-sighted post on the subject...


its not a recovery but nice try. almost every single solitary reason for giving up a pet is for selfish reasons. this one is not, but i also believe its lack of good training. teaching a dog to sit is far from a fully trained animal. nonetheless, im greatly hoping this dog can find a good home. but, with this dramatic change you can bet the snapping will only get worse.
 

toosassyforyou

Beach Comber
Aug 18, 2009
7
12
Savannah, GA
I'm going to take this last comment as this is how you handle yourself when you are embarrassed for sticking your foot in your mouth. Just a tip for yourself; in the future maybe you should give the human as much benefit of the doubt as quickly as you do the animal, and just as the question why before jumping to conclusions. Furthermore, I don't appreciate you aggravating a situation that I have already been forthcoming of how painful it is to have to give away my dog. In case you missed it, I'm trying to find an animal a good home which was the purpose of this posting. For the record, he is a very well mannered dog who has received more love and obedience training then most I've seen come into the vet's office I previously worked at.
I didn't know this was going to turn into a web war with a want to be Cesar Millan (AKA Dog Whisperer). Sorry Cesar!!
Savannah, GA
 
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Sarah Moss

Beach Lover
Apr 5, 2006
217
27
Black Creek
Best of luck finding him a new home. I have always wanted a boxer but we have a full house already and I am told I can't have any more dogs (we have 3 already).
 

SneakyPete

Beach Lover
May 8, 2009
113
61
You know....all the time I hear "it's all in how you raise them." Well, it's not. As a foster mom, I've raised puppies from seven days and up. With a couple of them, I could tell from the time they were very very young that they were going to be unsuitable for families with young children. They were hand shy at a very young age, not interested in people from a very young age, accepting of but not solicitive of praise and affection, attached to a single family member (or particular family members), not accepting of visitors or unsolicited affection from anyone other than a single or particular family members. All red flags that were present or developing from birth, and undeterred, despite lots of behavorial intervention from an experienced owner at a very early age. But that kind of insight comes from A LOT of experience with A LOT of different puppies (of varying breeds and temperaments). Dogs, like children, are born with a personality, and early intervention and training can mitigate the negative characteristics and encourage the positive ones, but no amount of training or intervention will change a dog's inherent temperament.

I have one dog that I've raised from infancy. He was heavily socialized as a puppy both with other dogs and with people. He is fine at the dog park with other dogs. He is loving and sweet around all of our immediate family members, and tolerant of a few frequent visitors. But he will never be safe around children or strangers. He must be put away when unfamiliar visitors visit. Even with us, we must be careful with him if he's in high alert mode -- I would never grab his collar or try to mandhandle him if he was scared/barking/anxious/predatory. I get his leash and leash him up, calm him and move him to his kennel. All of that "Be Alpha! Show him who's Boss!" viewpoint would result in a bite to the face. We calmly mangage his behavior; we do not control who he IS.

While there are techniques you can use to manage a dog with issues (as we do), NONE of that really matters when you're dealing with a dog/child situation. I'm pretty harsh when it come to rehoming, but when a family is put into a situation where the dog might bite a child (and thereby earn a quick trip to the needle) then the dog must be rehomed for it's own safety and for the safety of a child (who is incapable of either protecting himself or participating in any preventative training).
 

Diane4145

Beach Fanatic
Sep 3, 2005
1,183
62
Santa Rosa Beach, FL
Prayers were answered!

I'm so happy that you found a good home and felt sure, that you would!:clap: It's just so sad at your additional difficulty, brought on by a member of this board!:bang:
Thank You to everyone who responded! I found my boxer a wonderful home today (with no children!).
 

toosassyforyou

Beach Comber
Aug 18, 2009
7
12
Savannah, GA
I'm so happy that you found a good home and felt sure, that you would!:clap: It's just so sad at your additional difficulty, brought on by a member of this board!:bang:


Me too!! Yes, prayers were answered! I've already called to check on the dog, and he's doing great. I just hope I don't bug her too much by checking in. She's very understanding, and knows I miss him so much.
The pig headed comments that were made didn't make things any easier, but you always have that one person in the group. I'm confident I did the right thing, and overall it was my decision, not his.
Thanks for the pep chat! Take care!
Savannah, GA
 

mikecat adjuster

Beach Fanatic
Oct 18, 2007
635
293
Seagrove.
www.myspaceherspace.com
its not a recovery but nice try. almost every single solitary reason for giving up a pet is for selfish reasons. this one is not, but i also believe its lack of good training. teaching a dog to sit is far from a fully trained animal. nonetheless, im greatly hoping this dog can find a good home. but, with this dramatic change you can bet the snapping will only get worse.

All I can say is Wow! I had a dog when I was young. It was well trained. A cute little mutt and loved me more than anything. When I went to bed, if it was in the middle of my pillow, I just went without a pillow. It went everywhere with me. Through snake infested swamps and head high weeds. I loved my dog and it loved me.

It protected me from a bully one day and when I was older it sat between my girlfriend and I when we got 'too close'. Again, the dog loved me. I could take food from its mouth. I could leave a steak in front of her and leave the room and she would NEVER touch it. This dog was impeccably trained.

But, one day as I reached for her beneath a lounge chair, she snapped at me. Do you really believe that every ounze of anything can be trained out of a dog? I know good, really good people who have gotten into fights or arguements etc. The dog snapping at the person's child is no indication of any fault of ownership and there is no reason to search for a cause. I'm not saying it can't be constructive, but come on, it sounds like the owner was a great person and master.

Just my two cents.
 

ticklersgirl

Beach Comber
Jun 22, 2009
11
1
close to the beach
That's so GREAT toosassy!!! I'm so very happy for you. I am a boxer owner myself and couldn't bare the thought of having to find my babies new homes. I know that had to be a hard feat for you, but the safety of your children should always come first. I think you are a strong person for doing what you did....I just hate you caught h*ll from some of the other people. In the end, you did the right thing. :)
 
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