Emergency BCC Meeting - 8/1/05

Discussion in 'Local Government and Groups' started by For The Health Of It, Jul 29, 2005.

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  1. Smiling JOe

    Smiling JOe SoWal Expert

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    I don't recall anyone saying so, but the pile of Alabama topsoil at the CR 83 public access at Blue Mtn has been replaced, I hope, with good looking beach-colored sand. I still wonder what happened to the other. Is it still underneath the white stuff. Or is it the sand that has been used to shore-up the homes? Anyone know?
     
  2. Richard

    Richard Beach Comber

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    The county removed just about all the red dirt at the highway 83 access. Of course there is still a stain on the beach but the mountain is gone. After that someone has started bringing in white sand to that site. The red sand that was moved from the original big mountain to the house to the east is still there.
     
  3. Beachlover2

    Beachlover2 Beach Fanatic

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    Just recd this e-mail



    Secretary Castille asked me to respond to your e-mail regarding the placement of brown sand at the Blue Mountain Beach access in Walton County.


    The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) recognizes the impact of Hurricane Dennis on the Panhandle Beaches and opened a field office in Walton County to assist with the recovery efforts. Based on my conversation with field staff, I understand that the Walton County Commission met last Monday night and, as a result, the brown sand was removed from the east side of the access point except for that material that was placed behind walls for retaining purposes or capped with 3' feet of good white sand. They will now begin working on removing the brown sand from the west side of the access point.



    Staff continues to assess the hurricane damage in detail and work with local governments and homeowners to determine appropriate actions that will restore the beach and dune system and protect it against future storms.



    In addition, we continue to work on the hurricane recovery actions necessary to address the damage from last year's four devastating hurricanes and one tropical storm. As a result of these storms, the Department developed a Hurricane Recovery Plan to address both short term and long term recovery of the state?s beaches. You may visit our web site at http://www.dep.state.fl.us/beaches/ to review the Hurricane Recovery Plan in its entirety. I further encourage you to periodically check our web site for updates on our efforts in response to these devastating storms. I have also attached a question and answer document for local governments and property owners that may be helpful.



    Collectively, these actions represent a massive workload and an unprecedented recovery effort. We appreciate your comments and your patience as we approach hurricane recovery in the most organized, efficient and responsive way possible.



    John R. Peterson

    Director

    Office of Citizen Services

    DEP

    3900 Commonwealth Blvd. MS49

    Tallahassee, FL 32399

    850-245-2118

    SC 205-2118

    850-245-2128 Fax

    john.r.peterson@dep.state.fl.us
     
  4. SGB

    SGB Beach Fanatic

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    I'd love to see the Q&A attachment, if that's possible. Thanks!
     
  5. Beachlover2

    Beachlover2 Beach Fanatic

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    It's three pages

    Here is the first

    BEACHES AND SHORES
    Question and Answers for Local Governments and Property Owners
    Florida Department of Environmental Protection

    What is the Department?s role in protecting and managing Florida?s coastline?
    Along with regulating construction along Florida?s coastline, the Department plans and manages nourishment projects to restore eroded shoreline in coordination with the federal and local governments.

    What activities does the Department regulate and permit along Florida?s shoreline?
    The Coastal Construction Control Line (CCCL) Program regulates construction waterward of the Coastal Construction Control Line and landward of mean high water to protect beach and dune systems, dune vegetation and sea turtles. Regulated activities include the construction of homes, condominiums, hotels and seawalls.

    The Joint Coastal Permitting Program regulates activities waterward of the mean high water line to protect beach and dune systems, natural resources and water quality. Regulated activities include beach restoration and nourishment, jetty and breakwater construction, inlet dredging and any other dredging or filling below mean high water.

    Local governments ensure that coastal structures are constructed to withstand storm impacts through local building permits.

    What actions is the Department taking to restore and protect Florida?s shores following Hurricane Dennis?
    Following Hurricane Dennis, the Department:
    ? Issued a 60-day Emergency Final Order on July 11 to provide local governments, businesses and property owners with regulatory relief for debris removal and structure repair landward of the mean high water line.
    ? The emergency relief authorizes repairs in nine counties, without notice, for 60 days following the hurricane but does not waive permits for beach renourishment.
    ? Engineers are conducting damage assessments to identify impacts to the beach and dune system and upland structures seaward of the coastal construction control line. A damage assessment report will document storm impacts to beaches and coastal development, and recommend repair activities.

    What structural repairs does the DEP?s Emergency Final Order authorize?
    Under the Emergency Order, residents or local governments in Monroe, Bay, Franklin, Wakulla, Gulf, Escambia, Santa Rosa, Walton and Okaloosa counties can repair or restore the following coastal structures to the authorized configuration without a permit:
    ? Utility, public and private infrastructure.
    ? Public, private and commercial buildings and ancillary structures.
    ? Docks, piers and seawalls.
    ? Fences, signs and billboards.
    long
     
  6. Beachlover2

    Beachlover2 Beach Fanatic

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    ? Buoys, navigational aids and channel markers.
    ? Drainage systems and water control structures.

    Emergency permits can be authorized by the Department for replacement of substantially destroyed structures.

    The Emergency Order expires on September 7, 2005.

    What action can local governments take to mitigate storm damage?
    Under the Emergency Order, seaward of the Coastal Construction Control Line and landward of mean high water, local governments and utilities in Monroe, Bay, Franklin, Wakulla, Gulf, Escambia, Santa Rosa, Walton and Okaloosa counties can authorize:
    ? Removal of hurricane-generated debris, leaving beach-compatible sand on site.
    ? Removal of sunken vessels or structural remains, leaving beach-compatible sand on site.
    ? Repair of public utilities, roads and beach access points, including repair of surviving beach/dune walkovers.
    ? Return of sand deposited upland by the hurricane to the beach and dune system.
    ? Restoration of damaged dune systems using compatible sand. The sand may not be obtained from the beach or below the mean high water line, seaward of the CCCL.
    ? Restoration of damaged dunes using beach-compatible sand from upland sources.

    Any removed debris should be deposited landward of the CCCL.

    Is beach scraping authorized?
    Beach scraping is not authorized under the Emergency Final Order. Emergency permits, may be issued, however, where there is a threat to upland development and sufficient sand can be scraped without adversely affecting the beach.

    Can sand be dredged from offshore and pumped under structures?
    No. A Joint Coastal Permit would be required to dredge sand from offshore.

    What can private property owners do?
    The Emergency Final Order authorizes local governments to issue permits for activities seaward of the Coastal Construction Control Line to private and public property owners to temporarily secure structures, remove safety hazards and prevent further damage or collapse of foundations.

    Property owners should contact the building department of their local government to obtain permits. Local governments can provide the DEP with a statement of intent to issue permits by calling (850) 488-7708 or faxing (850) 488-5257.

    Can I build a new seawall?
    Property owners and local governments may not construct structures or armoring that did not exist before the emergency without the necessary permits, including new
     
  7. Beachlover2

    Beachlover2 Beach Fanatic

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    seawalls or docks. A DEP administrative permit is needed for new bulkheads, seawalls, revetments or other rigid coastal structures.

    Is armoring allowed under emergency conditions?
    Yes. Under emergency conditions, local governments may authorize temporary armoring to immediately protect public and private infrastructure like homes, utilities and roads if those structures are threatened. The local government must notify the Department and obtain a permit within 60 days of installing the armoring if the structures are to become permanent.

    What about repairing beach and dune erosion caused by the hurricanes?
    Local, state and federal agencies will work together to provide short and long-term beach repair. The Department?s coastal engineers began conducting aerial and ground beach assessments from Wakulla to Escambia County on July 12, 2005.

    These detailed assessments will document the impact of the storm on the Panhandle shoreline. While many impacted beach and dune systems will recover naturally with time, intermediate actions may be necessary to accelerate the natural process and provide coastal communities with storm protection. The Department will use the beach assessments to identify needed local beach projects ranging from dune restoration to beach restoration and nourishment.

    Where can I get more information?

    AREA SERVED CONTACT PHONE NUMBER
    Statewide Tony McNeal 850-921-7745
    Statewide Coastal Armoring Sri Tammisetti 850-921-7846
    Bay County Rolando Gomez 850-921-7841
    Escambia County Fritz Wettstein 850-921-7780
    Franklin and Gulf counties Valerie Jones 850-921-7849
    Monroe County Fritz Wettstein 850-921-7780
    Okaloosa County Rolando Gomez 850-921-7841
    Santa Rosa County Fritz Wettstein 850-921-7780
    Wakulla County Kris Christie 850-921-7790
    Walton County Jim Martinello 850-921-7772

    Information on emergency relief and post-storm permit requirements is available at www.floridadep.org/beaches. The beaches and shores damage assessment report will be posted upon completion.




    Kurt if you want to delete - I will understand - it is quite lengthy.
     
  8. Kurt Lischka

    Kurt Lischka Admin Staff Member

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    Hurricane Dennis report by Florida State DEP:

    http://bcs.dep.state.fl.us/reports/dennis.pdf

    Excerpt:

    The entire coast of Walton County sustained major beach and dune erosion (condition IV) and major damage to numerous structures from the impact of Hurricane Dennis. The erosion impact was comparable to the impact of Hurricanes Eloise (1975), Opal (1995), and Ivan (2004). The impact of Dennis exacerbated the severe erosion conditions which had not recovered from last year.

    Major structural damage was sustained along Walton County?s coast and was related to storm surge and waves undermining dwellings supported on foundations that do not conform to current building code standards. Major damage to nonhabitable understructure enclosures and appurtenant structures was also due to storm surge and waves. Wind damage to structures was not observed. In addition, many older dwelling
    structures that are located at the top of the steep, eroded dune bluff are in imminent danger of structural damage as the soil beneath the concrete slab foundations slips down the unstable slope. Along several areas, the dune bluff recession leaves many pile supported dwellings sited on the beach.

    Erosion now threatens the upland access and utility connections to these gulf-front properties, as well as the upland public infrastructure. Dana Beach (R116-R119) and Rosemary Beach (R119-R121) were critically eroded and could have been damaged more had the underlying peat strata not
    been present.

    A total of 11 single-family dwellings and seven nonhabitable major structures (six swimming pools and one garage) were destroyed. All these structures were sited seaward of the established CCCL. Another 13 single-family dwellings and 2 multifamily dwellings sustained major damage to their nonconforming foundations. These structures were also sited seaward of the CCCL. Additionally, 25 dwellings supported on nonconforming foundations are in imminent danger of structural damage as the soil beneath the concrete slab foundations slips down the unstable slope of the eroded dune bluff. In addition, a total of 19 habitable structures sustained moderate to major damage to nonhabitable understructure enclosures. Also, 400 feet of retaining walls were destroyed or sustained major damage.
     
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