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Mango

SoWal Insider
Apr 7, 2006
9,712
1,360
New York/ Santa Rosa Beach
My dog seems to have an affinity for certain seaweeds, the ones that look like sticks. I have no clue what could be toxic or not, so I have been taking it from him as quickly as possible. Do any other dogs like it, do you let them eat it, are any toxic? Going to do a google search, just thought I would ask people from experience.
 

Sarah Moss

Beach Lover
Apr 5, 2006
217
27
Black Creek
We recently saw a dog who needed an intensive surgery costing over 5k to remove seaweed from his intestines, but it wasn't around here. You are right to take it away from him immediately.
 

Mango

SoWal Insider
Apr 7, 2006
9,712
1,360
New York/ Santa Rosa Beach
Sounds like you are taking about Sargassum Weed. Not positive but I doubt it is toxic. Might make him sick though. Does he really want to eat it or just tasting it or playing with it?

More like playing with it and chewing it, the same way dogs hold sticks. He doesn't seem to be chewing it to eat, but I am sure he swallowed some. He seems to be ok.
 

Mango

SoWal Insider
Apr 7, 2006
9,712
1,360
New York/ Santa Rosa Beach
Found some interesting information on the web, although, I am not sure what is what, so I guess weeds are off the menu for my dog.

There has been a lot of published information and product promotion of green foods for people and pets in the last few years. Green foods can include sea vegetables and certain grasses. These foods are considered nutrient rich in amino acids, minerals, vitamins and the new ‘phytonutrients’, such as lycopenes and carotenes. Most are considered to be ‘whole foods’ in that they are complete foods and can be fed daily.
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Seaweeds are considered the best of these green foods, as they do not require cellulose to encircle the cell wall, which is difficult for dogs to digest. Seaweeds average about 25% protein and 2% fat. They are one of the richest sources of minerals and amino acids found in a plant source. Their dense amounts of nutrients are thought to help produce energy, enhance the immune system, and darken coat color and skin pigment. Seaweeds are also rich in iodine and support the endocrine glands (thyroid functioning).

Maybe this is the reason the dog you saw needed surgery, Snerd? (from the same article link above:

Do make sure if you are feeding these types of sea vegetables to your dogs, that you grind them or pulverize them first, as they make a ‘gel’ that can result in a blockage in the intestines of our canine friends if it is fed whole or in strips.

Here's another interesting link I found:
Why do dogs eat seaweed?
 
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