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What does "nonconforming" mean re. hurricanes and property

Discussion in 'All About SoWal' started by Paula, Aug 2, 2005.

  1. Paula

    Paula Beach Fanatic

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    "A total of 11 single-family dwellings and seven nonhabitable major structures (six swimming pools and one garage) were destroyed. All these structures were sited seaward of the established CCCL. Another 13 single-family dwellings and 2 multifamily dwellings sustained major damage to their nonconforming foundations. These structures were also sited seaward of the CCCL. Additionally, 25 dwellings supported on nonconforming foundations are in imminent danger of structural damage as the soil beneath the concrete slab foundations slips down the unstable slope of the eroded dune bluff. In addition, a total of 19 habitable structures sustained moderate to major damage to nonhabitable understructure enclosures. Also, 400 feet of retaining walls were destroyed or sustained major damage."

    The above quotation was from the official postings following Dennis (posted by Kurt) -- the thread was locked so I couldn't respond on the thread.

    Could someone explain what "conforming" means in regards to foundations? Also, what does "seaward of established CCCL" mean? Were these older buildings that didn't meet building codes?
     
  2. kurt

    kurt Admin Staff Member

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    Nonconforming = older buildings on slabs. If you build to the new codes and you build back far enough = no problem.

    http://www.dep.state.fl.us/beaches/programs/ccclprog.htm
    The Coastal Construction Control Line Program (CCCL) is an essential element of Florida's coastal management program. It provides protection for Florida's beaches and dunes while assuring reasonable use of private property. Recognizing the value of the state?s beaches, the Florida legislature initiated the Coastal Construction Control Line Program to protect the coastal system from improperly sited and designed structures which can destabilize or destroy the beach and dune system. Once destabilized, the valuable natural resources are lost, as are its important values for recreation, upland property protection and environmental habitat. Adoption of a coastal construction control line establishes an area of jurisdiction in which special siting and design criteria are applied for construction and related activities. These standards may be more stringent than those already applied in the rest of the coastal building zone because of the greater forces expected to occur in the more seaward zone of the beach during a storm event.
     
  3. Paula

    Paula Beach Fanatic

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    I thought that's what it meant but wasn't sure. It sounds like much of the construction that was lost was built prior to the new codes designed to preserve the environment and withstand hurricanes. I assume when people rebuild, they have to rebuild according to the new standards (which would be good for them and good for the environment)? Thanks.
     
  4. kurt

    kurt Admin Staff Member

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    In general, people are always battling the DEP and often trying to get variances to build as close to the water as possible, especially pools. The DEP is seen as the frustratingly slow, bad guy in most cases.

    People who have existing homes that are nonconforming may not want change, and will do anything to save their home. If their home is more than 50% damaged and insurance is collected, they may like change. Still it might cost much more to rebuild than the insurance pays, especially with the more stringent codes.

    Let's say an owner of a gulf front home has lost all their protection. And let's say they have no insurance or inadequate insurance. The worst case scenario of another hurricane that destroys their home becomes a problem which is certain to cause stress. There will still be great value in the land right? What if another storm takes enough of the land so there is no buildable footprint left?
     
  5. Kim Smith

    Kim Smith Beach Lover

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    That is a good question. I know in my area several of the beach front homes are sitting on pilers with no sand and some no way to access the home because it is gone. They have no way of moving it back because there are homes built behind them. What happens in these case? Will the "backfill" be enough to keep them withstanding or will they have to tear them down and walk away.
     
  6. beachmouse

    beachmouse Beach Fanatic

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    Most insurance companies will have an option on the policy if you want coverage to cover the cost of rebuilding to cover new building codes, rather than straight replacement "brick for brick". Since we're a bit inland, and at 50+ feet above sea level, it wasn't that much more for our policy. Not sure how much difference it would be for a at grade beach cottage.
     
  7. aquaticbiology

    aquaticbiology fishlips

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    Since the law is set by the CCCL and the grandfather will run out eventually, probably by attrition of the offending dwellings, most non-CCCL situated dwellings wont be insurable as the major insurance companies will just cite the non-CCCL and wont accept the contract for the dwelling. I can also see the CCCL getting pushed back even further by 2010 or so. Just dont build anything new closer than 1/8th of a mile (thats 660 feet or 220 yards or ~ 2 football fields from the current shoreline), as was done with the big resorts in Hilton Head after Andrew. Another horrible-r issue before us is 'disposable' beachfront housing, which is designed to be built very cheaply, get blown away, then rebuilt very cheaply again. Mother nature dosent care either way. She dosent even know your house is there.
     

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