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Gulfview Heights Access Video

Gulfview Heights Access has parking, restrooms, showers, picnic tables with shelter, and lifeguards during peak season. Located 3 miles east of the intersection of Scenic 393 and Scenic 30A (Gulf Place). Turn south off Scenic 30A by Goatfeathers Seafood restaurant at Gulfview Heights street, then 1/4 mile to the gulf.
Florida's beach warning flag program uses flags in four colors accompanied by interpretive signs along the beach to explain the meaning of each color.
GREEN: LOW HAZARD - Calm Condition, Exercise Caution

Van Ness Butler, Jr. Access Video

Van Ness Butler, Jr. Access is ADA accessible, and has parking,  restrooms, and lifeguards during peak season. Located on Scenic 30A,  sandwiched between Seaside & WaterColor, Florida. Parking is on the  north side of Scenic 30A, hidden from view. Turn north on Western Lake  Drive and then take an immediate right into the parking lot.
Florida's beach  warning flag program uses flags in four colors accompanied by  interpretive signs along the beach to explain the meaning of each color.
GREEN:  LOW HAZARD - Calm Condition, Exercise Caution

Dune Allen Access Video

Dune Allen access is ADA accessible, and has parking, restrooms, and lifeguards during peak season. Located on Scenic 30A about 2 miles west of the Scenic 393 intersection at Gulf Place. Just across Scenic 30A lie Lake Allen and Oyster Lake, 2 of SoWal's rare coastal dune lakes.

Florida's beach warning flag program uses flags in four colors accompanied by interpretive signs along the beach to explain the meaning of each color.

Santa Clara Access Video

Santa Clara access is ADA accessible, and has parking, restrooms,   and lifeguards during peak season. Located on Scenic 30A, 1/2 mile east   of Scenic 395, turn south on Bramble Grove Road.
It's hidden from view  from Senic 30A which makes it feel special and private, and often it's  not crowded unless it's peak season. Lots of locals stop here to eat  lunch or use the restroom.

Anna's Stories: "Worm Thumping" With Tuff Smith

Notes from Anna and Tuff’s younger sister “Billie” about the technique and methods used to catch worms for fishing. Tuff Smith of Grayton Beach and the historic “Smith House” is well known for his fishing prowess. Anna (Smith) Reardon was known for her writing, but little sister Billie also liked to share stories.

Sonny Hollingsworth was taught how to catch worms and fish by his Uncle Tuff. They fished throughout Walton County, Florida. Sonny is at Grayton Beach around 1940 in this photograph.

Saint Rose: How Santa Rosa Beach Got Its Name

The Spanish began naming towns, rivers and bays, usually after Saints, as they explored and colonized Florida in the 16th Century. In the 17th Century, following Saint Rose’s death and Sainthood, the Spanish name a major bay in what is now the Walton County, Florida area “Santa Rosa Bay” and publish the name on maps of Florida.

The name was changed by the British around 1778 to Choctawhatchee Bay. Thus, the longtime Spanish name of Santa Rosa Bay became unknown to many contemporary residents and visitors to South Walton and Florida.

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