photos - Blue Mountain Beach access - 7/28/05

Discussion in 'Photos and Videos' started by Kurt Lischka, Jul 28, 2005.

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  1. Smiling JOe

    Smiling JOe SoWal Expert

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    I know that the Chandler Brothers at Owl's Head have much whiter sand than this horse sh_t. After seeing this crap, I have decided to cut my trip short, and am heading back to SoWal to attend the meeting on Mon. Oh, how this upsets me greatly. I cannot scream loud enough with my keystrokes. I know that removing sand from the beach is against local ordinances, but if anyone has a wheelbarrow, I am willing to get arrested. (Will someone please feed my dogs, and let them out to poop if I go to jail?) Who has that wheelbarrow? I am serious. I have a shovel and some 5 gallon buckets, and if I had a truck, I would fill the Ro's driveway with this topsoil. I will verify if it is indeed Ro before I take such action. I am pissed!!! :pissed:

    I am curious if Ro, family, or friends sold them the dirt. Anyone know which one?

    I am not encouraging destruction of property, but I know what writer, Edward Abbey would have his characters do in this situation.
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2005
  2. phdphay

    phdphay Beach Fanatic

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    I mean, red Georgia clay wouldn't look any worse (not meaning to offend any of my fellow Georgians)? Did someone lose the Munsell-ometer?
     
  3. Miss Kitty

    Miss Kitty Meow

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    This looks like a bad joke using trick photography. Galveston has LIGHTER colored sand than this...heck most beaches in America have lighter sand! All sand huggers need to unite! I will personally send bail $$$ if SJ, et al. need to proceed with buckets, shovels, hands to remove this hidious soil and run into trouble. Sorry I can't be there to join in the concern....I am with you in "fighting" spirit.
     
  4. Sandie

    Sandie Beach Comber

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    Will send $$$$$ if SJ needs it to get out of jail. It's a shame what they are doing!! What the #*!! where they thinking??? On, I get it, they were NOT thinking. I suppose if each of them get enough phone calls and emails, they may get the message! If not, maybe when it's time to go to the polls to vote, the people of SOWAL could give them the message!!
    No offense taken on the GA red clay statement. We love our red clay, but not on the beaches of SOWAL!! I hope the house if full and the people let the Commissioners know EXACTLY how they feel!!
     
  5. aquaticbiology

    aquaticbiology fishlips

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    call every judge you can find that is local or has experience with the area. get an injunction on the use of the dark sand right now, today or it will be too late (may be too late already) as the amount dumped will reach a halfway point of the total to be dumped and after that it IS too late to do anything about stopping it
     
  6. Rita

    Rita margarita brocolia

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    MONDAY isn't soon enough! How about TODAY?! :pissed: :bang:
     
  7. Rita

    Rita margarita brocolia

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    Another thought --- This TOPSOIL mixed with white sand in front of the homes needing help could devalue their real estate! They shouldn't want that and are likely as appalled as the rest of us :!:
     
  8. Paula

    Paula Beach Fanatic

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    I posted the following paragraphs on another thread (e.g., the one regarding the emergency meeting), but they may be useful here. If people are concerned about preserving what's special about SoWal beaches, as well as the value of their homes (which is often tied to what people believe is unique and special about their area), then it's important to not do anything that would remove us from being listed in any of the "best beach" rankings that we are included in -- we are included in these rankings because our beaches are among the best in beauty, conservation, etc., in the country. It's important to help and support the people who have gulf front property preserve their homes, but not at the expense of the rest of SoWal (I imagine less than 1% of the people live in gulf front properties, which is what the brown sand -- which seems to be a short-term and cheap fix -- is meant to protect) -- especially when there are other and better alternatives (albeit more expensive alternatives but that may be part of the anticipated high costs of having gulf-front property).

    If you go to http://www.drbeach.org you may get information about Dr. Beach's (Dr. Stephen B. Leatherman writes from his laboratory at Florida International University) "national healthy beach campaign" (SoWal beaches are recognized among his list). You may find some data that supports the concern about the dark sand here.

    "Beach material" is one of the criteria used for judging the beaches... the categories are "Fine sand Medium sand Coarse sand Cobbles Rocky/Muddy" -- this may be useful information.

    For those of you who are more familiar with beach standards, you may want to go to his website to see all of the 60 criteria. It certainly serves SoWal to continue to be on his list of recognized beaches. He's the one who selects the top 10 beaches every year (Grayton was one of them several years ago).

    Can't be at the meeting but certainly support the efforts of people who will be there to preserve the beauty and uniqueness of our beaches.
     
  9. Rita

    Rita margarita brocolia

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    My wife (Rita) keeps close tabs on this message board, and she showed me this thread today. Unfortunately, it no longer amazes me what some people think they can get away with. However, we need more than moral outrage to help fight this. So, I'm sharing some information with you that I hope will help you that are close enough fight a better battle (we live in Arlington, TX, but have a house in the Dune Allen area), one based more on science than emotion.

    First, a little about myself. I am an agronomist with the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. We are the agency that helped develop the Munsell Color Chart used to classify soil color (in an earlier post, someone referred to the Soil Conservation Service - that was us before a reorganization and name change about 10 years ago). My B.S. was in Soil Science, so I am familiar with how soil and soil materials are described and classified. That's not my area of expertise now, but I can point you toward links and resources that may be useful.

    For more information on the Munsell Color classification scheme for soils, go to:

    http://soils.usda.gov/technical/manual/contents/chapter3f.html

    Here is a brief explanation, but you really need to follow the link to see some illustrations of the system.

    The Munsell color system uses three elements of color?hue, value, and chroma?to make up a color notation. The notation is recorded in the form: hue, value/chroma?for example, 5Y 6/3.

    Hue is a measure of the chromatic composition of light that reaches the eye. The Munsell system is based on five principal hues: red (R), yellow (Y), green (G), blue (B), and purple (P). Five intermediate hues representing midpoints between each pair of principal hues complete the 10 major hue names used to describe the notation. The intermediate hues are yellow-red (YR), green-yellow (GY), blue-green (BG), purple-blue (PB), and red-purple (RP).

    Value indicates the degree of lightness or darkness of a color in relation to a neutral gray scale. On a neutral gray (achromatic) scale, value extends from pure black (0/) to pure white (10/). Gray is perceived as about halfway between black and white and has a value notation of 5/.

    Chroma is the relative purity or strength of the spectral color. Chroma indicates the degree of saturation of neutral gray by the spectral color. The scales of chroma for soils extend from /0 for neutral colors to a chroma of /8 as the strongest expression of color used for soils.

    One of the posts mentioned that a Munsell color of 6.2 was the lowest value that was considered acceptable for sand added to the beach. However, the "6.2", which I assume is a Munsell "value", is meaningless without knowing what hue (the basic color) range this value is in.

    The NRCS has offices in almost every county in the country, and our employees are always available to help you with questions about our soil resources. Here is contact information for three people who should be able to answer some or all of your questions. I suggest contacting them in the order they are listed:

    Terry Smith
    USDA-NRCS
    239 John Baldwin Road, Suite 2
    DeFuniak springs, FL 32433
    850-892-3712 EXT. 3
    Terry.Smith@fl.usda.gov

    Terry is the District Conservationist in Walton Co., and if he can't answer your questions, he can contact:

    Jeff Allen
    USDA-NRCS
    4155 Hollis Drive
    Marianna, FL 32448-2708
    850-482-2002 EXT. 111
    Jeff.Allen@fl.usda.gov

    or

    Andrew Williams
    USDA-NRCS
    c/o Santa Rosa Co. Health Department
    Environmental Health Services
    5840 Gulf Breeze Parkway
    Gulf Breeze, FL 32563
    850-932-9824
    Andrew.Williams@fl.usda.gov

    This is probably way too much information for many of you, but for those of you who will be carrying the fight for our beaches, I hope this is helpful.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 30, 2005
  10. Kurt Lischka

    Kurt Lischka Admin Staff Member

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  11. Sandie

    Sandie Beach Comber

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    Are they putting that dirt on the beaches of Watercolor, Seaside, & Seagrove? Is this just taking place at Blue Mountain? I hope the citizens can get this STOPPED! It's a shame.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2005
  12. Kurt Lischka

    Kurt Lischka Admin Staff Member

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    The only place I've seen soil that dark is at the BMB access and the home directly adjacent to the east in the photos.
     
  13. Smiling JOe

    Smiling JOe SoWal Expert

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  14. Kurt Lischka

    Kurt Lischka Admin Staff Member

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    It was on its side and he coaxed it back up. I'd bet he's rolled more than once.
     
  15. BeachDreamer

    BeachDreamer Beach Fanatic

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    He's poppin' a wheelie.
     
  16. BeachDreamer

    BeachDreamer Beach Fanatic

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    Unfortunately, once it's washed out to sea with the first big storm, it will be spread all over 30-A.
     
  17. SoWalSally

    SoWalSally Beach Fanatic

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    Hurricanes' Lesson: Don't Build on the Beach
    by Orrin Pilkey and Andrew Coburn

    A record four hurricanes this season have crossed Florida, but the results are not new. Beaches on the few remaining natural barrier islands have not only survived, they are as healthy as beaches always are after storms. The natural barrier islands of Florida, like those everywhere, require hurricanes to provide sand in order to survive while sea levels continue to rise. But it is a different matter on developed islands, where we see promises of cash and a huge outpouring of sympathy for storm victims, including those who owned buildings immediately adjacent to beaches.

    In the chaos of the storms' aftermath, we sympathise with beachfront property owners as much as we do with those whose homes were destroyed inland. But what could be more irresponsible than building next to an eroding beach that is subject to frequent major storms - particularly since the sea level is rising at a rate of about a foot per century along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts? The storms not only caused major damage to buildings along the beach, but also quantitatively wiped away artificial beaches all over Florida and Alabama. Replacing the beaches will likely be paid for by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and will cost in excess of $100 million during the next few years. Hasn't the time come to look at beachfront development more closely?

    The long record of storm damage should have provided a clue to beachfront-property owners. For example, the Florida Panhandle and Alabama coast were hit hard by Hurricanes Frederick (1979), Opal (1995) and now Ivan. What we discovered from Frederick and Opal (and Hugo in 1989 and Fran in 1996) is that hurricanes are urban-renewal projects. New buildings that replace damaged buildings are bigger and more costly. The attitude is, why not rebuild and in a big way, because the federal, state and local governments will be there waiting to help if there's another storm.

    Take Gulf Shores, Alabama, where the beach was replenished with federal funding in 2001 and again after Tropical Storm Isidore in 2002. This year, the federal government will be there again with more money and more sand. We are spending a huge amount of money to save the property of a very few people.

    The price society is paying for beachfront development will only go up, and each storm will make this point again. But there are some things we can do:

    End the sympathy for beachfront-property owners and recognise foolish acts for what they are.
    Encourage the removal of destroyed and threatened buildings and replace them with natural dunes.
    Stop charging federal and state taxpayers for replenishing beaches. ​

    If we do replenish, then require communities to prevent the construction of big buildings next to the beach, so we can maintain some degree of flexibility in responding to a rising sea level in the near future.

    Pumping sand on a beach is environmentally damaging. Every critter in the sand is killed. One of the most telling events during Ivan was the reduction in property damage along a stretch of Alabama shoreline where two rows of dunes had been retained, all because of an endangered beach mouse. The mice saved buildings by forcing the preservation of the dunes. Elsewhere in Alabama and Florida, dunes were removed to increase the sea view and building sites.

    Americans must learn to look at their shorelines with a long-term view. To do this, we must step away from the politics of greed and honestly debate the future of our beaches for our great-grandchildren.

    Orrin Pilkey is the James B Duke professor emeritus of earth sciences and author of A Celebration of the World's Barrier Islands and How to Read a North Carolina Beach. Andrew Coburn is associate director of Duke University's Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines.

    Source: USA Today Wednesday 29 September 2004
     
  18. CastlesOfSand

    CastlesOfSand Beach Fanatic

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    Just sent my two cents worth via email! Good luck! Keep us posted.
     
  19. BeachDreamer

    BeachDreamer Beach Fanatic

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    "We are spending a huge amount of money to save the property of a very few people."

    Those are cold hard facts, but they are facts nevertheless. Same with trucking in "dirt". The beach belongs to everyone, and it is being risked in an attempt to save the homes of a select few. Any efforts to "fix" things will only be temporary, in any case. What a sad situation...
     
  20. rwt

    rwt Beach Crab

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    Great work to all for the quick response and efforts to save the beaches. I've sent e-mails to all of the public officials listed in this thread. Although I will not be there tomorrow, I will be down on Thursday and Friday to work on our house. If I can do anything at that time, I am happy to take some time out to do so while I'm down.

    Is there a group to which I can contribute dollars that might aid in the fight?
     
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