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seagrovegirl

Beach Fanatic
Feb 9, 2008
3,885
454
Historic Old Point Washington
I have not done any research relating to non toxic forms of insect repellent and am interested to know if there is current research info available and what the SWMCD may be doing to find non toxic forms of insecticides? It would not hurt to look into it or to pass that info along to the general public. If no research has been done locally, what research has been done abroad in Florida? What would stop SWMCD from using non toxic forms of mosquito repellent? These are thoughts I have had since this thread started and it seems others would like these as well. I support SWMCD but have to say, non toxic would be my choice if I had one that was effective.
 

Billie

Beach Comber
Jul 13, 2007
30
4
Seagrovegirl...SWCMCD is not interested in testing non-toxic forms of mosquito control. They stated this in an email this year to me. Another concerned resident whose husband has cancer, contacted the company Cedarcide and had SWCMCD sent a free sample of their product for testing. They had it for a long time and then turned to it over to me because they flat out refused to test it now or in the future. Most countries aside from the US have banned permethrin because it is a known neurotoxin, even in small amounts. You can see my list of ways it harms humans and the entire ecosystem above in this thread. The scientific community is filing lawsuits on behalf of endangered species across the spectrum of the ecosystem. Studies have shown permethrin time and again to cause disease in humans. SWCMCD also uses BTI (a larvicide) , which are not perfect, but not a neurotoxin. It is used in a liquid form in the waterways to kill the larvae. The neurotoxin permethrin is what they consider an Adulticide to kill the adult mosquitos if it makes contact with them. They are not spraying this at dusk in most instances when the mosquitos are out because people are out? Lately they have been spraying at 9 p.m. when no mosquitos are present for the neurotoxin to kill. It just goes straight into our air, water, soil to accumulate and harm us all. This neurotoxin builds up over time and is stored in the fatty tissues of the body in humans. I have had many people speak to me about temporary paralysis and numbing from being close to the spray over years of exposure. The options that are available to SWCMCD is to only use a BTI and/or use it in conjunction with an non-toxic product on the market like Cedarcide or another product. This antiquated system of poisoning people for the profits of chemical companies running our country and lining all the pockets through the chain will come to an end. Every day I learn about organizations bringing the truth of science to the forefront in this battle for safe mosquito treatments. Please be a voice and demand change for our health and safety of our families and our fragile ecosystem.
 

Bob Hudson

Beach Fanatic
May 10, 2008
1,066
739
Santa Rosa Beach
Seagrovegirl

Prior to my serving as a Commissioner the SWCMCD tested a “non-toxic”product in the Pt Washington area. The product was “Cactus Juice”. The testing of any product must be scientifically designed with control groups to avoid the pitfalls of anecdotal results. Homeowners volunteered to participate in the study. They did not know if they were in the control group or the group that had the product applied to their property. That study produced no positive results (the control group and the test group did not show a significant change in the trap counts or landing rates), but did show many drawbacks for use in a broad application.

Products such as Cactus Juice and Cedarcide are label listed as “barrier products”. They require spraying the entire property with sufficient liquid/product to wet all the grass, shrubbery etc. to be effective and are diluted quickly by rain, lawn watering etc. Their use is very labor intensive.

Cedarcide was the product that a sample was given to the SWCMCD. Its labeling does not list its use as a product to be applied through a ULV machine and once again is based on a “wetting” of the entire area to be protected. South Walton has about 80,000 square miles of land. About 40% of that land is state or federal land which means the broad use of the product would require a wetting treatment of about 58,000 square miles.

The labeling states that the product would have to be reapplied monthly. Please imagine the amount of labor, water and product involved in such a project. It would also require our technicians to physically come on each homeowners land and spray the entire lawn, shrubbery etc. Cedarcide is a oil extracted from cedar bark. It leaves a oil slick or sheen on everything it touches and has been shown to produce rashes and skin irritation on skin sensitive individuals.

Its use would also be an “off label” use as the people that sell the product have not tested in for ULV application.

I believe the product does “repel” mosquitoes but is not marketed to Mosquito Control Districts for many reason. The process of certifying a product for commercial use is a long expensive process that the manufacturer or producer is responsible for.

Our director and staff are constantly reviewing “best practices” in use within the Mosquito Control industry for a 100% safe product that can be utilized for effective control.
 
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Bob Hudson

Beach Fanatic
May 10, 2008
1,066
739
Santa Rosa Beach
At this time of the year as days get longer the start of spraying is moved later to try to match the application time to the "most active time" for mosquitoes.

At this time spraying begins at 7:00 pm. Most spray routes are 4-41/2 hours in duration. Mosquitoes are active during that entire period at this time of year.

Certain species are active in the early morning and we have begun to spray certain areas beginning at 3:30 am and continuing until 8:00 am.

BTI based products are available in granules, cakes and liquid form and we use them all. BTI products kill mosquitoes during the larvae and pupae stage. Different formulations work best dependent on the development stage our technicians find in standing water.

Mosquitoes have a very short life cycle and can build resistance to any product if that product is consistently used or over used. That is the main reason that a mosquito district will have a broad spectrum of products (larvicides and adulticides) and rotate them on a regular basis.

The same is true in humans as antibiotics become ineffective over time with use/overuse.
 
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Bob Hudson

Beach Fanatic
May 10, 2008
1,066
739
Santa Rosa Beach
Bob, can you tell me what species(s) is active during the day?


The most prevalent is the "Asian Tiger" Mosquito.

1. Container breeder
2. Know to carry West Nile Virus
3. Very aggressive bitter



(CBS News) There's a nasty mosquito invading the U.S. that is sure to take a bite out of your outdoor summer plans. The insect is called the Asian tiger mosquito, and it has a blood-lust for humans but will also attack dogs, cats, birds and other animals.

Unlike other mosquitoes that tend to only come out at certain times, the Asian-tiger variety will bit all day long, making it hard to avoid the bug. Their eggs are also much stronger than the average mosquito and are tough enough to survive the cold winter.

Asian tiger mosquitoes are one of the most common and widespread mosquitoes in Florida. Outdoors, they bite only during the daytime (sun-up to sundown). They will sometimes bite after dark, but only when there is illumination from outdoor lights, or when they get indoors. They only breed in containers or tree holes and would never be found breeding in puddles, ditches or ground pools.

The black-and-white striped bug was brought to Texas 30 years ago in a tire shipment. Since then, it has spread to 27 states.

asian_tiger_mosquito_01.jpg
 
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NotDeadYet

Beach Fanatic
Jul 7, 2007
1,422
489
Thanks Bob. I have seen those, they are pretty distinctive. Not what I have these days.
 
It has been raining like crazy here in GA where they don't spray. Hubby can walk from the car to the house and get bitten up by mosquitos causing huge welts all over his arms and legs. He bought one of those dry mosquito repellants. It's working great and not yucky like those greasy ones are. BTW he is not a Southerner (but has become one after living here since he was in college) and has a Ph.D. with a specialty in not using chemicals that would harm humans and thus result in lawsuits for his company. He's happy to spray up. I am a Southerner and have a Ph.D. and educate myself about the pros and cons of certain chemicals. Note to self and others: Groups of people should not be profiled as ignorant or whatever just because of their race/ethnicity/birthplace/etc.
 

Bob Hudson

Beach Fanatic
May 10, 2008
1,066
739
Santa Rosa Beach
The predominant daytime biting mosquito species around residential property is the Asian tiger mosquito. There are a number of mosquito species that breed in woodland flood pools or forest puddles that will bite during the daytime in the shade of forest or under open sky on overcast days.

Most of these woodland pool species will only be a problem when the breeding habitat is in forest that is contiguous with the citizen’s residence. There is a large, aggressive, daytime biting mosquito species (the dark rice-field mosquito) that most commonly breeds in puddles that occur in open sun light, i.e., fields or forest clear-cuts.. It attacks in broad daylight. It can also sometimes be found breeding in roadside ditches and wheel rut puddles.

Two of the species that breed in salt marshes will bite during daylight hours. One of these salt-marsh species bites only in the shade of trees, or under open sky on overcast days; the other may sometimes bite humans in broad daylight when their resting habitats are disturbed.

Asian tiger mosquitoes are persistent biters, but they are also cautious and sneaky. They will often flit away in response to a sudden movement, and generally, they bite only when people are standing relatively still, or moving slowly. They tend to bite the ankles, legs and backs or undersides of arms where they are less likely to be noticed.

Many of the woodland pool species are fairly aggressive and will try to bite a person on the head, face or upper body even when that person is walking. Dark rice-field mosquitoes and salt marsh mosquitoes can be very aggressive biters and will try to bite a person even as the person is running or waving a broom at the mosquites.
 
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NotDeadYet

Beach Fanatic
Jul 7, 2007
1,422
489
Thanks. Must be a woodland pool species. I do have contiguous woods with some wetlands that aren't wet all the time, but they are these days. They are very aggressive, follow me around and hitch a ride into the house in my hair. There's also been a lot of standing water around here in places that don't normally have any, like the empty subdivision down the street which turned into a lake.
 
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